Approach Management

Video: Electrical Hazards

Electricity is an energy source we use constantly, but often take for granted, ignoring its potential hazards.

It does not take a lot of electricity to kill you. The amount of current in an ordinary 60-watt light bulb can kill a person.

 

 

 

Electricity is an energy source we use constantly, but often take for granted, ignoring its potential hazards.

Electrical hazards are real and potentially fatal.

Secondary injuries associated with electrical contact can be cardiac arrest, a loss of consciousness,
burns and falls.

It does not take a lot of electricity to kill you.

The amount of current in an ordinary 60-watt light bulb can kill a person.

So, consider all electrical equipment on construction sites as potentially deadly.

What are the ways one can receive an electrical shock and behaviors to use to avoid electrical
hazards?

Some examples how you can receive an electrical shock is,

1. a defective power tool
2. a defective or damaged extension cord
3. overloading a switch or over-riding a by- pass
4. not grounding electrical equipment
5. contact with live overhead electric lines

How can you avoid electric hazards?

Tools and equipment should always be inspected for frayed cords and defective plugs before using them, such as a missing ground pin that has been removed or damaged, look for broken insulation on the cord;

All cords must be protected from damage, which can occur when passing through a door or window;

- Cords are not to be stapled or hung from nails;

- Always keep extension cords out of the water when in use.

When using hand and power tools ensure that:

- Power tools are double insulated or have a ground pin

- Avoid standing in water and operating a power tool

- Disconnect all electrical tools and cords when not in use

Other considerations are;

- All temporary lighting is equipped with bulb covers

- All power supplies, circuit boxes and breaker boxes are properly marked to indicate their purpose

- Provisions are made to prevent machines from restarting automatically by using Lock Out Tag Out (LOTO) procedures.

All exposed electric circuits 50 volts or greater such as receptacles, light-bulb sockets, electrical panels, and switches must be guarded by using approved enclosures. Keep these areas only accessible to qualified workers.

Who can work on electrical? Only those who are qualified as an electrician, or those that have education, degree or has extensive experience such as journey level worker - lineman

Overhead power lines (High Voltages)

- You must maintain a minimum distance of 10 feet or more if are near overhead power lines. You may need to be further away if the voltages are higher. Consult with the local utility to determine what the voltages are! Never second guess!

- Keep all equipment away from power lines as they are conductive objects. There have been too many fatalities when workers contact overhead power lines.

- Consider all power lines "live" and avoid them.

Finally
It's important to take the time every day before work begins to inspect and be aware of electrical hazards. The fluid nature of the activities, the changing environment, can create high potential for dangerous exposures and dangerous activities. There are no second chances with electrical contact.

Remember, you deserve to go home, you are important to your employer, co-worker and especially family.

Let’s be safe out there.

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